Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Family Secrets and Falsehoods

One of the challenges genealogist face is what do you do when your run across a family secret? Or a falsehood that was passed down? It is an issue we all must face at one time or another.

My grandfather has had some very interesting falsehoods as I have traced his documentation. I knew since I was around 7 he had a son by a previous marriage. But that is it. My mom swears she knows the name of her half brother, but I am not so sure she's right.

Over the years as more records have become available, I was able to find both of the marriages my grandfather had previous to my grandmother. Based on the data, I know that his first wife is the mother of his son. I also know from her records that by May 1945 she was "remarried" (questionable) and had no child with her, but this is the same time frame my grandfather's infant "son" should have been born.

His next marriage is in September of 1945. I then stumbled across a letter at Fold3 regarding a court martial for my grandfather for going AWOL for 6 weeks, which explains how he married someone in Alabama when he was stationed in Tampa. I know he got an honorable discharge, I have his discharge paperwork, but somehow between October 1945 and his discharge in 1946 his court martial decision got reversed.

Grandma said that she met Pop's son. The time frame for that is a little tricky. Was it in 1948 in California where they met and married, or was it in 1949 in Syracuse, New York. And the question of all questions is when did Pop kidnap his son. See Grandma said he got custody of him but gave his son back to the mom because she was married. But Grandma's sister said she saw a newspaper article about Pop kidnapping him. Was it in 1945 when he went AWOL? Or was it in 1949 when his ex wife was living in New York city and had another son?

This is important because I can't find his son. His ex wife remarried in 1951 and didn't have a son at that time who was 5 years old. Did he die? (I can't find his death in NY before 1950 or FL at all).Or was he adopted out, legally or illegally? I have looked for a newspaper article about it too. Nada, zilch. So the question is an open ended one for now.

Then there is my grandfather's marriage record to my grandmother. My grandfather had been using the last name of Mieirs since 1939, about the same time his mother had married a Fred Meier. On his marriage record, he lists his name as Mieirs (not Hager) and then he lists his father as Fred Meier, not his real father Claude Hager. His military records and earlier marriages were by his legal name

That would make sense except if you knew what he gave as the source of his name. Mieirs was supposed to come from where he worked, not from a stepfather!

His half brother has been another source of misinformation and falsehoods. My grandfather said his brother was named Eugene Melvin Tyler and he was born Nov 12, 1923. Now Pop never had dementia, and he wasn't wrong on details, all of his cousins said his name was Gene. In fact, Gene is the name written down for him by my Pop's Aunt.

Gene had bad health after childhood. He had a head injury and had seizures. My grandparents last saw Gene in the early 1950's. I have seen letters Pop wrote to the Red cross in the 1970's looking for his brother. He never found him. In the mid 1950's Pop had disowned his mother, and he never did look for her. Had he done so, he would have found his brother. Oddly enough, after 1965, even her own siblings didn't look for her. Her sister Rena had the address for her that was the same address she died at in 1983.

I did finally find Gene, but let me tell you, it has been no easy feat. First, years ago, I got the death certificate for Pop's mom. I called the funeral home for an obituary. They said there was none, but that a James Tyler and another man had given the information. James was not a relative according to the funeral home.

A few years, and data base availability later, I find James M. Tyler, born Nov 12, 1921 died two miles away from Pop's mom, in a nursing home. His social security death index said his social security number came from Oklahoma.

Another few years, and Cook county has death certificates for certain years online. James Tyler's is blank, no data. I have been looking for more information on James Tyler for at least 8 years. Nothing. I think this is Gene, but can't prove it. None of the cousins or their wives know anything. Last they recall they saw Gene not long before his Aunt Rena died.

Today I find this.







Same birthdate, lied about year. And oh yeah, Rena Day is Pop's Aunt.

So I am not sure how my grandfather thought his brother was named Eugene (Gene), or if Gene changed his name like his brother. But for 17 years, I have been looking for the wrong name. James M. Tyler who died in Chicago alone in 1989 is my grandfather's brother. I have ordered his Social security application just to be sure, though I think this proves it.

I am pretty sure he lied about his relationship to his mom to the funeral home. I am guessing he didn't want to, or couldn't, pay for her funeral. When I think that my great grandmother died when I was 15, and my great Uncle when I was 22, and all the years we could have known them, it makes me sad.

And the reason my Pop disowned his mom, it was over another lie. She told him his father died when he was 2. He died in prison when he was 8.

These aren't the kind of lies that tear apart families. They aren't secrets, not like the adopted son my Grandmother didn't talk about. Yet, I do think they illustrate that even when you think you know someone, there is always the possibility of things you never knew. I spent most of my time with my grandfather until he died when I was 30 years old. It wasn't like I wasn't close to him, and even though he didn't talk a lot about his past, I never would have dreamed of the things he kept hidden and lied about.



Tuesday, August 1, 2017

I Must Have a Genealogical Angel Part Two

Over the years I have spent countless hours helping others with their genealogy. I view it as my way of giving back. It's something that I am good at, and something I enjoy, and it seems the least I can do is help others.

In April I blogged about helping an adoptee (from my Hardy line) find her birth mother. About two weeks ago (July 18th)  I helped someone else. This adoptee contacted me about a high match to my father's sister. I looked at the matches in common and knew what family it came from but it was too vague. So I sent her a message back on Ancestry to email me a few screen shots of her highest matches.

I got the email, and I knew exactly which family she came from, and I was pretty sure which sibling of my great grandfather, but asked her to call. She gave me her information on what she knew and I asked her to share her results with me. She had said an agency had offered to help for a hefty sum, I asked her to give me a crack at it first.

When I looked at her matches, she had four second cousins, and several third cousins. Her highest second cousin matched at the level of a first cousin once removed or half first cousin. It had no tree, but I knew the last name because of the account manager. The second highest second cousin had a tree, with the B. family, that matched exactly to two or three other trees on the third cousin level.

As a side note, always check the match, several of hers had a drop down menu for the tree but it wasn't attached. Also, one had a private tree attached, but under the profile name they also had their tree so I was able to (the highest third cousin match) identify another surname A., who had married into the B.'s in the tree I had found under the second cousin.

In the third cousin level, I found another distinct family grouping, the N. family among four of her matches. The others either had no tree or were matches I already knew matched into the Barnes family. Her last two second cousin matches were from the Barnes family. The highest was a third cousin of mine, and the other was my father's first cousin. The next highest Barnes match was my Aunt, followed by several of my father's first cousins and a few second cousins and second cousins once removed.

From the information she told me, I pretty much knew, we were a paternal match. Because no one in our family was Catholic and from South Carolina (the only other non identifying information from the Catholic Charities was the ages and descriptions (height, hair color and eye color) of her parents.

So first I looked at my Barnes family. I was looking for a 29 year old great grandson of John Lunsford Barnes and Margaret Eleanor Baker. Because of the various great grandchildren who she matched at more distant level, I looked first at the closest sibling, the great grandfather of her highest second cousin match.

To be honest, I did look at all of the siblings, and only found 4 or 5 of the right age, but, I really really concentrated on James Marshall Lunsford Barnes (Lunnie), because his great grandson was her highest match. And the first night, I settled on one who I thought was the father, because he matched the description (from an arrest warrant website no less) and was the right age. But Lunnie had 19 grandchildren, so I wasn't positive. So I reached out to one of Dad's second cousins who is a friend on Facebook.

It took a few days for my cousin to get back to me, but I communicated with the adoptee via texts and emails and phone calls on my progress. And I worked on those trees, first the B. and then the N.. I wasn't really getting anywhere. I knew which of the B. couples were her great grandparents, but not which of the children was her grandparents. I actually discovered the N. part on day number 3.

I used Google and found an obituary that showed the R. H. was the first cousin of her birth mother, but again, I wasn't sure how. I knew from the genealogy I had built on the family that only four of the siblings were old enough to be her grandparent, and two of the obituaries I found appeared to rule out two of those four siblings, so I had two men left. One had died but I couldn't find an obituary.

I moved onto the N. tree and worked on all of the many siblings who could be her great grandparents. And there were a lot of them. I filled in the grandparent's generation. Nada. I couldn't find a single N. married to a B. And they lived in entirely different states. Newspapers for both areas didn't give me a single clue.

Day four I searched Facebook for members of the B. family, and I found a few. I messaged them, Tried to find phone numbers. and I didn't get very far. But day five, day five while looking through their friends I noticed something, a N. was on one of the profiles. Aha. I don't know why, but I searched ancestry for Norma N., and bingo, an obituary popped up that gave me a sister who was Mrs. XX B. Okay. So I had nailed it down.

In the meantime, I had talked to my cousin and the wife of the "grandfather" I felt was her grandfather. We had pretty much all decided she was the daughter of James Barnes who had died in 2015. I did the work and found his mother's name, (finally!) and worked on her tree. And then I looked at her fourth cousins. I found four trees with Purvis who went back to the same couple as James Barnes maternal grandmother's.

That pretty much sealed it for me. I called the adoptee and told her I had done it (in five days!). I knew who her maternal grandparents were, but not her mother's name, and I was pretty much positive her father was James Barnes who died in 2015. I also messaged a few other family members, including a sister of her birth mother.

I heard nothing back from the birth mother's family. And I thought, well, I just won't hear anything, but I did today. And today the adoptee got to talk to her Aunt.

Once again, I am so grateful that I was able to facilitate a reunion and assist an adoptee with finding her birth parents. The name the Aunt knew confirmed her father too. So there we have it. DNA solved another mystery, and I just helped with a bit of research. That and my genealogical Angels who always seem willing to give me a hand.

Saturday, April 29, 2017

The Trahern's in Virginia

This is probably not the right title, because the family of Nehemiah Trahern's brother, William Trahern resided in Loudon County, Virginia, and what I plan on talking about is Nehemiah's family who were in Pittsylvania county. You can find in the Loudon county probate records on Ancestry the will for James Trahern and his sister Sarah Trahern if you are from that branch.

Nehemiah and his sons are listed in the personal property tax lists of Pittsylvania which I detailed in an earlier blog. With the probate records available now, I have found a little more information on his will and his estate.  The will was first presented to the court on September 17, 1804. For some reason it was presented again on October 19, 1812 and that was when it was recorded. Since James Trahern was a non resident of Virginia (he was in Mississippi) and Samuel Hester, who was in Mecklenburg county refused to act as executor, Samuel Trahern and James Patterson were made the executors.

Oddly enough, we don't see any records until 1819 when the estate was inventoried and the sale is listed. Census records for the county are missing for 1810, but we know that in 1810 James Trahern was living in Brunswick County, VA without a family and a male who was 16-25 which is most likely his brother William. James Trahern assigned a deed September 17, 1804 from himself to Cunningham and Trahern, which is when he officially went into a business partnership with Alexander Cunningham.

Alexander Cunningham who was a trader appears to be in partnership with James until 1828. Duke University has a collection containing papers belonging to Alexander Cunningham and several family members which they indicate shows his brother Richard M. Cunningham dealt in cotton with James and William Trahern. They also have a collection of daybooks from the business of James and William Trahern. In 1811 Cunningham and Trahern were involved in a Chancery suit for a recovery of a debt. In 1828 Cunningham and Trahern sell to William Boyd the land that James Trahern sold to the company in 1804.

We know James Trahern was in Mississippi for most of the period between 1810-1819, at which time he had a son, my ancestor James N. Trahern. He is in the census of 1820 in Pittsylvania county with younger males and females, but the deeds of 1820 show no dowager, which appears to indicate that these are his nieces and nephews, and not his children. In 1820 John Trahern, Samuel Trahern, Polly Trahern, William Trahern and Ann Trahern (wife of William I believe), sell to their brother James Trahern their share in the land of their father Nehemiah Trahern. Also in 1820 James buys from the guardians of his sister's children, Elizabeth Hester and Serena Patterson more of the estate.

Although the will lists several more siblings, there is nothing to indicate that they were alive in 1820 because James goes on to sell the land purchased by his father in 1779 to Samuel Harston in 1822. In the sale of the estate of Nehemiah Trahern the purchasers are his children, William, John and Samuel, his son in law, James Patterson, a daughter in law Nancy Trahern (? wife of Samuel), and Edward Murphy, John Ware, James Smith and Stephen Beasley. Leading me to believe that Millie, Hester, and Mary Ann had died prior to 1819. We already know that Serena Trahern Patterson died by 1813, and both Elizabeth Trahern Hester and her husband, Samuel Hester were deceased by 1820.

Chancery cases in Henry county and Lynchburg indicate that John Trahern and his family moved to Tennessee in the 1820's. John Trahern has died by 1832 according to the court records. Wesley Trahern lived in Mississppi from 1808 and may have sold his share of the estate to his brother for part of the $5000 debt he had borrowed and still owed upon his death in 1825. The will of James Trahern written in 1824 and proven in 1831 leaves all of his estate to his brother William.

There is a James Trahern Jr., and a Mary Trahern (his widow), along with William Trahern and his wife Ann who show up in Hinds county, Mississippi between 1824 and 1830. There is also a Joel Trahern born around 1800 who appears in Louisiana around this time. It is quite possible that Joel and James were the sons of Samuel Trahern and his wife Nancy, as their is a complete lack of census records for him due to destruction of them, and his brother James does not have a family based on the evidence. William Trahern was not old enough to have been the father of either James or Joel.

Samuel Trahern has no estate or interstate records for Pittsylvania county. He was last living there in 1850. I have been unable to find any record of a marriage for Polly Trahern.

Jonathan Church the neighbor of Nehemiah Trahern mentioned in the deeds also came to the area from Maryland and was along with Nehemiah an early member of the Methodist Episcopalian Church on the circuit of John Asbury. I have often wondered if perhaps Jonathan is a relative of Amelia who we still have no maiden name for. 


Locating My Pittsylvania County Roots

One of the hardest things over the years has been to trace my Trahern family in Pittsylvania county. Primarily because the only way to find records was to go there in person. Yesterday while looking into the Loudon county Trahern's, I found out that records for Pittsylvania probate are online. Included in these records was deed books, which gave me a much better idea of where my family was located.

Nehemiah Trahern first purchased land in February 1779 from Richard Gritton. The land was 237 acres encompassing both sides of Bean Creek (now McGuff Creek). In 1784 he obtained a land grant for 217 acres that began at the corner of Church's (Jonathan Church) and Davis line on Mobley's mountain. So where was Mobley's mountain?

In 1803 Nehemiah and his wife Amelia sell the land on Mobley's mountain, containing all orchards and woods to Peter Wilson. I found also on a website the following deed information.

Pittsylvania Co VA DB 13

p.510 8 Nov 1803 Robert Price & Sarah his wife to Peter Wilson. 100#'s. 180 acres on Mobley's Mountain. Signed: Robert Price, Sally Price. Wit: Robt Mack, Ro. Harrison, Samuel Trahern. Wm & Ro. Harrison obtained Sally's permission on 10 Dec 1803. 19 Dec 1803, proved by witnesses.
p.541 ___ of ____ 1801 Jonathan M. Church Senr to Robert Price. 100#'s.187 acres. Wilsons & Trahern's line, Davis's line. Signed: Jonathan M. Church Wit: Saml. French, Jonathan M. Church Jr, Wm Cobbs, John Guinn. 20 Jul 1801, proved by two witness; 16 Jan 1804 proved by third.

Mobley Creek which is mentioned in other deeds on this page is now called Trotter Creek. Mcguff (Bean) Creek flows into Trotter Creek and are a tributary to the Dan River. The only mountain near Trotter (Mobley) Creek is Judy Byrd Mountain, which I assume was once named Mobley's Mountain. 

Here is a map with the landmarks for the deeds.






The highway is highway 311. Berryhill, Virginia and Buford, Virginia are the two towns about equidistant from the point where Trotter and McGuff creeks y together.

After nearly 20 years of research, and much more for some of my Trahern cousins, we now have an idea where our family resided in Virginia.

Sunday, April 9, 2017

Segment groupings for the Hardy DNA



With the addition of so many testers for the Hardy family on Gedmatch,  and since it lacks the double relationships of the McCurdy family (which would make it so much more complicated), I decided to examine the frequency of matching segments within this family grouping. This comparison includes descendants from three different lines of Gardner Hardy and his wife. Aside from one sibling pair and one grandparent/grandchild relationship, no two are closer than 2nd cousins to each other. Kits not on Gedmatch (several other DNA kits at Ancestry) are excluded from table. I did not include myself (since my father’s in the matches) but did my daughter (out of curiosity). I did not include the nephew and great niece of MW, nor did I include LQ or AJ from Gedmatch. (I forgot to include their numbers in the tag group).

Relationships to Gardner Hardy and wife Harriet
GG granddaughters HH, MW and BO (2 sibling lines)
GGG grandchild CB
GGGG grandchildren AF, CP, LB, JB, and KW (2 sibling lines)
GGGGG Grandchild me (omitted) 
GGGGGG grandchild BM


HH
BO
MW
CB
CP
KW
JB
LB
AF
BM
HH
NA
3C
3C
3C1R
2C1R
2C1R
2C1R
2C1R
3C2R
2C3R
BO
3C
NA
½ 2C
3C1R
3C2R
3C2R
3C2R
3C2R
3C2R
3C4R
MW
3C
½ 2C
NA
3C1R
3C2R
3C2R
3C2R
3C2R
3C2R
3C4R
CB
3C1R
3C1R
3C1R
NA
4C1R
4C1R
4C1R
4C1R
3C1R
4C2R
CP
2C1R
3C2R
3C2R
4C1R
NA
3C
3C
3C
5C
3C2R
KW
2C1R
3C2R
3C2R
4C1R
3C
NA
3C
3C
5C
3C2R
JB
2C1R
3C2R
3C2R
4C1R
3C
3C
NA
S
5C
G
LB
2C1R
3C2R
3C2R
4C1R
3C
3C
S
NA
5C
GA
AF
3C3R
3C2R
3C2R
3C1R
5C
5C
5C
5C
NA
4C2R
BM
2C3R
3C4R
3C4R
4C2R
3C2R
3C2R
G
GA
4C2R
NA


C COUSIN
R REMOVED
G GRANDPARENT/CHILD
GA GREAT AUNT/GREAT NIECE 

KEY
A979331 = HH
A163770= CP
A469842=CB
A479920=AF
A702878=KW
A141915=MW
A294597=LB
A317751=BO
M155722=JB
A935169=BM

Notes on the participants:
AF, LB and JB are related twice (3C1R Brunson) and MW, CP, LB and JB are related twice. (MW is 3C1R for CP and 4C1R for LB and JB Pyburn). CP, LB and JB are also 1/2 1C1R Pyburn. Some of their matches may be indicative of this. 

Because of the close relationships between LB and JB (siblings), JB and BM (grandparent/grandchild) and LB and BM (share more than normal for great Aunt relationship) I omitted their matches to each other from the table.

Segment Details:
Each chromosome block is separated. Matching triangulations are highlighted different colors if more than one per chromosome. Only segments greater than 7 cM were considered.

Chromosome 1 has two segments 1. CB, CP and HH  2. CB, AF and HH.
Chromosome 2 1 segment MW, HH and AF
Chromosome 3 1 segment HH, LB, JB and BM
Chromosome 8 1 segment CP, LB and JB
Chromosome 9 has three segments 1. HH, KW, LB, JB and BM. 2. CP, LB and JB   3. KW, JB, BM and HH
Chromosome 11 has two segments 1. MW, HH, KW and JB and 2. CP, LB and JB
Chromosome 16 has two segments 1. HH, JB, LB and BM and 2. HH, LB and JB
Chromosome 19 1 segment CP, LB, JB and BM
Chromosome 20 has two segments 1. CP, LB, JB and BM 2. CP, LB and JB



Chromosome position
cM

Kit 1
Kit 2

From
To

 Individuals
A979331
A163770
1
26253392
37188856
12.6
HH/CP
 A979331
A469842
1
18395918
34210183
21.3
HH/CB
A979331
A469842
1
37098064
54532654
16.9
HH/CB
A979331
A479920
1
36762623
54857729
17.9
HH/AF
A163770
A469842
1
26399842
34179429
9.0
CP/CB
A317751
A469842
1
235929210
238829389
7.3
BO/CB
A469842
A479920
1
37022675
61739170
28.2
CB/AF
A479920
M155722
1
203145327
221229369
21.4
CB/JB







A141915
A979331
2
5529323
8562151
8.2
MW/HH
A141915
A479920
2
8674
8572032
19.2
MW/AF
A979331
A479920
2
5194520
23025601
34.8
HH/AF







A979331
M155722
3
186275138
194766213
20.8
HH/JB
A294597
A317751
3
195429228
199302161
7.8
LB/BO
A979331
A935169
3
186275138
194369555
19.9
HH/BM
A979331
A294597
3
186275138
194594559
20.4
HH/LB







A163770
M155722
4
14571594
25566249
14.8
CP/JB
A163770
M155722
4
56163242
115532764
51.7
CP/JB
A141915
A317751
4
22783024
44240138
28.1
MW/BO
A141915
A469842
4
11260654
18305690
10.5
MW/CB
A163770
A294597
4
36636831
149210445
96.3
CP/LB
A979331
A317751
4
103425175
154140029
42.1
HH/BO
A163770
A479920
4
183469264
191117403
23.0
CP/AF







A979331
A317751
5
4728355
10647061
14.7
HH/BO
A979331
A317751
5
173884149
180623543
13.0
HH/BO
A979331
A294597
5
91139
5449166
16.6
HH/LB
A141915
A163770
5
43230470
72803922
18.0
MW/CP







A163770
A702878
6
52548929
77341549
13.9
CP/KW
A979331
A163770
6
76685732
94527150
12.6
HH/CP
A141915
A702878
6
90755541
115213539
22.0
MW/KW







A294597
A469842
7
128561006
139626312
17.8
LB/CB
A294597
A469842
7
139638793
147541365
9.6
LB/CB
A979331
A469842
7
100311486
128653625
21.3
HH/CB
A979331
A317751
7
78228236
92915996
13.7
HH/BO
A163770
A294597
7
152062575
155787451
13.0
CP/LB
A979331
A317751
7
140652473
153688926
23.7
HH/BO
A141915
A979331
7
135135332
139333773
7.6
MW/HH
A141915
A317751
7
140018
12976720
22.4
MW/BO







A163770
A294597
8
154984
19761371
36.8
CP/LB
A163770
M155722
8
11837063
19754748
14.2
CP/JB
A979331
A163770
8
141272891
146255887
6.9
HH/CP
A163770
A702878
8
138342832
143900614
12.6
CP/KW







A163770
A294597
9
9820675
22174674
20.6
CP/LB
A163770
A294597
9
74236384
97358747
31.8
CP/LB
A979331
A702878
9
105245648
115447048
13.3
HH/KW
A294597
A702878
9
36787328
75093675
8.9
LB/KW
A141915
A469842
9
77481681
92767566
24.7
MW/CB
A979331
A935169
9
22954237
72864176
22.1
HH/BM
A979331
M155722
9
22933509
76200501
24.0
HH/JB
A294597
A479920
9
91230295
106219930
14.5
LB/AF
A979331
A294597
9
36708368
74710880
8.8
HH/LB
A979331
A469842
9
9691768
18506996
15.5
HH/CB
A979331
A469842
9
92763654
109372390
15.6
HH/CB
A163770
M155722
9
36587
9793954
24.6
CP/JB
A163770
M155722
9
9820675
23077926
22.0
CP/JB
A702878
M155722
9
23029269
76336288
24.1
KW/JB
A702878
M155722
9
77257922
90007008
19.8
KW/JB
A702878
M155722
9
90025409
105812580
16.4
KW/JB
A979331
A702878
9
16831628
77780489
36.5
HH/KW
A935169
A702878
9
22975180
70303655
20.4
BM/KW
A935169
A702878
9
90752686
106321200
15.6
BM/KW
A163770
A294597
9
36587
9790624
24.6
CP/LB







A979331
M155722
10
43432251
58174129
10.1
HH/JB
A141915
A317751
10
78912098
98920382
20.1
MW/BO
A163770
M155722
10
124710874
129852662
11.3
CP/JB
A979331
A317751
10
100231194
117585534
16.7
HH/BO
A979331
A294597
10
131509629
135218153
7.9
HH/LB







A141915
M155722
11
11275540
22024112
19.1
MW/JB
A163770
M155722
11
120412692
131671950
24.6
CP/JB
A141915
A979331
11
12190304
20261673
12.8
MW/HH
A141915
A702878
11
11202952
21681310
18.7
MW/KW
A979331
A702878
11
12190304
20271219
12.8
HH/KW
A702878
M155722
11
6326952
24713901
30.5
KW/JB
A979331
M155722
11
12186013
20390059
13.3
HH/JB
A163770
A294597
11
120412692
131662082
24.5
CP/LB
A141915
A163770
11
21495631
37482970
19.7
MW/CP
A979331
A163770
11
36410807
57927370
10.4
HH/CP







A979331
A469842
12
4423593
11834044
14.8
HH/CB







A163770
A294597
13
45361852
77923366
25.1
CP/LB
A979331
A469842
13
48885869
67933662
8.7
HH/CB
A163770
A317751
14
18325726
22091770
10.8
CP/BO
A141915
A702878
14
18397823
21701057
10.6
MW/KW
A141915
A317751
14
20741156
30042415
17.7
MW/BO
A979331
A702878
14
22240100
36131784
26.5
HH/KW
A141915
A317751
14
67141763
75076130
9.2
MW/BO







A979331
A479920
15
56838189
79980837
29.2
HH/AF







A163770
A294597
16
83114818
86841204
12.4
CP/LB
A979331
M155722
16
12909860
25013707
18.7
HH/JB
A979331
M155722
16
77537248
81711523
13.7
HH/JB
A979331
A935169
16
77506742
79790065
8.1
HH/BM
A979331
A294597
16
12928118
25026271
18.7
HH/LB
A979331
A294597
16
50765270
60842865
17.0
HH/LB
A979331
A294597
16
77537248
81709762
13.7
HH/LB
A141915
A702878
16
63745808
76529684
10.6
MW/KW
A702878
M155722
16
81550330
83371654
7.6
KW/JB







A317751
M155722
17
12598569
15292929
10.9
BO/JB







A163770
A469842
18
10367306
20155913
11.9
CP/CB
A979331
A294597
18
42599978
47731053
7.1
HH/LB







A163770
M155722
19
45423785
55213143
15.6
CP/JB
A163770
A294597
19
3807656
14701575
24.4
CP/LB
A163770
A294597
19
45641512
55169512
15.2
CP/LB
A979331
A317751
19
1663898
10083195
28.0
HH/BO
A163770
A935169
19
45641512
55132371
15.1
CP/BM







A163770
M155722
20
11244
4001254
11.4
CP/JB
A163770
M155722
20
46866922
55987853
19.5
CP/JB
A163770
A935169
20
11799
1860981
7.2
CP/BM
A163770
A294597
20
11799
4001254
11.4
CP/LB
A163770
A294597
20
46866922
55987853
19.5
CP/LB







A979331
A702878
22
23813921
35301903
21.8
HH/KW
A979331
A702878
22
45300798
48499088
14.3
HH/KW







A163770
A469842
23
4638697
12647622
11.8
CP/CB
A163770
A479920
23
112505390
124911727
19.9
CP/AF
A469842
A479920
23
142568145
154886292
26.8
CB/AF